Defilement

KisakyeMoureen

By Kisakye Moureen

Feminist Wednesday is so excited to be partnering with Women in Leadership Uganda’s Teen Voices Programme, which encourages teens to write their stories. As a warning, this piece deals with sexual assault — please take care in reading ahead if you’re triggered by the subject. <3 

Sheena was my neighbour and my best friend in the village of Kyanfuba, Kaliro district. We used to share everything. But unfortunately, Sheena was not good at education, even though her parents had the money to pay for her school fees. Sheena was beautiful, tall with big dimples when she smiled, and by then she was thirteen years old. However, a forty-year-old man conned Sheena and defiled her. Continue reading…

Innovative Apps Designed for or Created by Modern-Day Women

KateHarveston (1)

By Kate Harveston

Most of us love the cool things we can do on our cell phones — chances are you’re reading this article on your favorite mobile device, right? Upwards of 75% of women in the United States own a smart phone, so it makes sense that there are plenty of apps specifically for women.

Unfortunately, they can be difficult to find, buried in a world of Angry Birds and Tinder. Whether you’re looking for an app to track your period, understand your health, or just find some new things to try, we’ve got you covered with a list of apps that are designed for or created by women (or both!). Continue reading…

Meet Cady Huffman, Director of City of Light

 

CadyHuffmanIntroduce yourself! Tell us who you are and what you do.

I’m Cady Huffman, the director of a new musical called City of Light. Mel Brooks dubbed me “The Mountain Every Jew Would Like to Climb.” I’m a performer who has had the good fortune to make my living in my chosen business for the past 34 years. I also direct, produce, write, teach and mentor young artists. All in all, one lucky gal. And I won a Tony Award for playing Ulla in The Producers. Continue reading…

What Would a Healthcare Plan That’s Good for Women Look Like?

EllieReilly

By Ellie Reilly

The GOP’s especially bad healthcare plan — known as the AHCA in the House and the BCRA in the Senate — has been all over the news lately. It’s important for feminists to stand up against attacks like this that not only hurt women but virtually anyone who cannot afford to pay for healthcare out of pocket.

It’s extremely tempting to go completely negative on this. After all, GOP senators and representatives have shown little to no interest in listening to their constituents on healthcare issues. However, we should remember that going negative was, at least in part, the strategy that landed the GOP in a host of trouble, with internal disagreement and faction rivalries flaring up. Instead, I want to take a moment to look ahead to think critically about what a good healthcare bill that helps women would look like. Continue reading…

Secrets About the Pink Tax: 5 Weird Things Women Pay More For

KateHarveston

By Kate Harveston

The topic of the “pink tax” is nothing new in modern American society. It’s generally known and accepted that women pay more for common necessities than men do, and there are lots of reasons given for why this has been accepted. Women are fighting back to lower prices to male standards, but to be able to wage a successful war against a system that’s profited off women for decades, women must understand how far the pink tax reaches. Continue reading…

Why Education is the Means to Human Rights for All Women

ReillyBy Ellie Reilly

Like many of us, I was fortunate enough to grow up in a place where I could receive an education mandated by the government. I wasn’t always treated well at school, nor did I receive the highest quality education available, but I graduated with a basic understanding of reading, writing, and arithmetic.

I, like many other Western feminists before me, didn’t fully appreciate the value of this education until much of my schooling was already complete — the second year of graduate school, to be exact. I used to complain about waking up early, waiting in the cold to catch the bus, and sitting through dreary classes. Continue reading…

Meet the Women Behind Girl Be Heard

 

GirlBeHeardHi! We’re Girl Be Heard, and we’re a nonprofit organization that strives to develop, amplify, and celebrate the voices of young women through socially conscious theatre-making. Girl Be Heard was founded in 2008, when a group of girls—brave, complicated, dynamic young artists with things to say—came together to tell their stories. Ever since, it’s been our mission to create spaces where girls & young women can come together to build community, learn about themselves & the world around them, and have their voices heard through their art. Continue reading…

Meet Arielle Nóbile, Creator of “Belonging in the USA: Stories from our Neighbors”

LegacyIntroduce yourself! Tell us who you are and what you do.

I’m the Founder/CEO/CCO of Legacy Connections Films and the creator of “Belonging in the USA: Stories from our Neighbors”, a new web series seeking to create empathy, connection, and a reimagining of what it means to be human right now in America.  I will interview different people to share their life stories, experiences, struggles, and wisdom, all in the context of this insane political climate we’re currently living in (without making it all about politics).  It will feel like you’re in each character’s living room, invited to join in on an intimate conversation between them and me, the curious seeker bringing out their story. Continue reading…

Imposter Syndrome & The Spiritual Practice of Saying “I Don’t Know”

6.8.17_ImposureSyndromeBy Amelia Kriss

I am not a religious person. Well, not now. I was at one point, and am humble enough to know that I could be again, though I won’t see it coming. As a life coach and a mental health professional, I spend quite a bit of time exploring the quandaries of values, purpose, and soul-level longing. Often, this brings me face to face with the spiritual lives of others, and with my own. I haven’t found this to be true with clients, but in casual “small” talk, I am sometimes skeptical of the “spiritual” label—especially when folks apply it to themselves nonchalantly in conversation—seemingly to cover for their own perceived heathen or shallow-ness, like a coat of flat beige paint. If there’s one thing I think I know about true spirituality, it rarely professes itself, and almost never in such general and un-ecstatic terms. And when it is alive in someone, as far as I can tell, it is almost never beige. I admit to a level of envy here—when I look back on my Southern Baptist roots, the world was rather black and white, but it was also deliciously certain. I knew things. And even now—last week—I sat chatting with a dear friend, a Shamanic healer, and witnessed the deep clarity in her eyes about the world to which she belongs. Covet is the word that comes to mind.   Continue reading…