Dress Codes-Keeping Women in Check for Decades

JenniferGregory_DressCodeJennifer Gregory
Covington, Texas

I spoke today with a female relative, Sandra, born in 1949. She told me about being forced to kneel in the hallway as a student in high school, to prove her skirt was the appropriate length. She expressed the humiliation she felt as she was forced to kneel and a teacher determined whether her clothing was acceptable for her to remain in school.
I was born in 1972, 23 years after Sandra. Continue reading…

How sleeping apart can save your marriage

TheresaBrawnerby Theresa Brawner, diet.st

Sleeping in separate rooms is traditionally considered as one of the signs of a problem in marriage, but a new study has led to quite different conclusions. Namely, an increasing number of couples are deciding to sleep in separate rooms. It’s a practical decision, and some of the reasons for this are that your partner is snoring and watching TV and, and you want to have some rest. Continue reading…

The Wage Gap Includes Us Too

MindaHartsBy: Minda Harts

When I started The Memo nearly two years ago, equality for Black women in the workplace wasn’t top of mind for many. The topic of equality for women seemed to be very one-size fits all. For example, the often quoted statistic that women make 77 cents for every dollar a white male makes, while concerning, doesn’t tell the complete story. Black women make 48 to 69 cents of what a white male makes. It is important to advance all women, while not forgetting that Black women face their own unique set of challenges in the workplace. When it comes to advancing black women in the workplace, where do you fall? Continue reading…

Defilement

KisakyeMoureenBy Kisakye Moureen

Feminist Wednesday is so excited to be partnering with Women in Leadership Uganda’s Teen Voices Programme, which encourages teens to write their stories. As a warning, this piece deals with sexual assault — please take care in reading ahead if you’re triggered by the subject. <3 

Sheena was my neighbour and my best friend in the village of Kyanfuba, Kaliro district. We used to share everything. But unfortunately, Sheena was not good at education, even though her parents had the money to pay for her school fees. Sheena was beautiful, tall with big dimples when she smiled, and by then she was thirteen years old. However, a forty-year-old man conned Sheena and defiled her. Continue reading…

Innovative Apps Designed for or Created by Modern-Day Women

KateHarveston (1)

By Kate Harveston

Most of us love the cool things we can do on our cell phones — chances are you’re reading this article on your favorite mobile device, right? Upwards of 75% of women in the United States own a smart phone, so it makes sense that there are plenty of apps specifically for women.

Unfortunately, they can be difficult to find, buried in a world of Angry Birds and Tinder. Whether you’re looking for an app to track your period, understand your health, or just find some new things to try, we’ve got you covered with a list of apps that are designed for or created by women (or both!). Continue reading…

Meet the Women Behind Girl Be Heard

 

GirlBeHeardHi! We’re Girl Be Heard, and we’re a nonprofit organization that strives to develop, amplify, and celebrate the voices of young women through socially conscious theatre-making. Girl Be Heard was founded in 2008, when a group of girls—brave, complicated, dynamic young artists with things to say—came together to tell their stories. Ever since, it’s been our mission to create spaces where girls & young women can come together to build community, learn about themselves & the world around them, and have their voices heard through their art. Continue reading…

Meet Arielle Nóbile, Creator of “Belonging in the USA: Stories from our Neighbors”

LegacyIntroduce yourself! Tell us who you are and what you do.

I’m the Founder/CEO/CCO of Legacy Connections Films and the creator of “Belonging in the USA: Stories from our Neighbors”, a new web series seeking to create empathy, connection, and a reimagining of what it means to be human right now in America.  I will interview different people to share their life stories, experiences, struggles, and wisdom, all in the context of this insane political climate we’re currently living in (without making it all about politics).  It will feel like you’re in each character’s living room, invited to join in on an intimate conversation between them and me, the curious seeker bringing out their story. Continue reading…

Imposter Syndrome & The Spiritual Practice of Saying “I Don’t Know”

6.8.17_ImposureSyndromeBy Amelia Kriss

I am not a religious person. Well, not now. I was at one point, and am humble enough to know that I could be again, though I won’t see it coming. As a life coach and a mental health professional, I spend quite a bit of time exploring the quandaries of values, purpose, and soul-level longing. Often, this brings me face to face with the spiritual lives of others, and with my own. I haven’t found this to be true with clients, but in casual “small” talk, I am sometimes skeptical of the “spiritual” label—especially when folks apply it to themselves nonchalantly in conversation—seemingly to cover for their own perceived heathen or shallow-ness, like a coat of flat beige paint. If there’s one thing I think I know about true spirituality, it rarely professes itself, and almost never in such general and un-ecstatic terms. And when it is alive in someone, as far as I can tell, it is almost never beige. I admit to a level of envy here—when I look back on my Southern Baptist roots, the world was rather black and white, but it was also deliciously certain. I knew things. And even now—last week—I sat chatting with a dear friend, a Shamanic healer, and witnessed the deep clarity in her eyes about the world to which she belongs. Covet is the word that comes to mind.   Continue reading…